Welcome guest, please Login or Register

   

fluidity in playing?

RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 128

Joined 2012-11-19

PM

I am getting quite good at finding the notes I need for riffs and licks, but I am playing the notes individually, how can I transfere from one note to the next with more fluidity? am I cutting one note off too quickly before I play the next one, do I need to let strings ring out longer, do I need to let one string ring out while I play the next?

some advice here would be great please?

Neil.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 797

Joined 2012-09-04

PM

as far as letting them ring out or not i would guess it depends on the piece you are playing
I know when i see a riff on line, and hear someone play it, when i try it usually doesnt sound like theirs did
mines a lot slower and more deliberate, but over time of you guessed it practicing the riff it gets faster and more fluid.I hate to say it but sometimes my voicing and expression of the riff never sounds like theirs,thats what make guitar players sound different,your own sound so to speak

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 279

Joined 2012-04-13

PM

There is only one cure for this….practise! If youre hesitating between notes then you arent yet comfortable with the scale or transition to the next string. I suggest you learn the major scale and practise it so you can play it all the way up and back smoothlyy and automatically no hestation. Do it slowly and accurartely at first, building up speed later. Uses a metrenome at about 50 beats per minute at first then increase slowly so eventially u can playy without error at about 110 bpm.  Youll gain speed and accuracy plus confidence too.
Neil E.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 128

Joined 2012-11-19

PM

Yes Butch, ‘deliberate’ is a word that sums it right up…..

I’m just gonna have to practice this piece over and over till it happens and I know eventually it will.

thanks for your input guys.

scales? the only scale I know by heart is the blues scale, which is another important one to learn?

I can’t do the scale fast but again PRACTICE is the key I guess!

Neil.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 1305

Joined 2012-10-16

PM

Sometimes I like to make up lyrics on the whim and sing them in my head while matching a riff, the faster my head can sing, the faster I can play the lick. Practice it that way and let me know. Also it gives you more feel in your playing, too!

     

Signature

Pete
Active Melody.com
Administrator/forum

I’m a Bob Lefsetz junkie
http://lefsetz.com/wordpress/

RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 797

Joined 2012-09-04

PM

neil groves - 18 August 2013 06:23 PM

Yes Butch, ‘deliberate’ is a word that sums it right up…..

I’m just gonna have to practice this piece over and over till it happens and I know eventually it will.

thanks for your input guys.

scales? the only scale I know by heart is the blues scale, which is another important one to learn?

I can’t do the scale fast but again PRACTICE is the key I guess!

Neil.

the minor pentatonic and minor blues are the only ones i know so far. i think the next one for me is the major scale
from what i understand the major pentatonic is the same as the minor only down the fret board 3 frets, which will in turn change the frets that will sound good bent,which i have to work on, on that scale.
just remember this guitar stuff is just like eating a whale, 1 bit at a time, and you ll get there

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 128

Joined 2012-11-19

PM

I’m starting to think that guitar playing is a lifetime of learning and that you’ll always find something new to learn each time you pick up the instrument.

The main thing is though to enjoy yourself, if you don’t enjoy it then you’ll not learn anything and why do it!

Neil.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 288

Joined 2012-05-19

PM

Butch and Neil,

The two best comments I have heard in a long time!!!!!!!!

Music is a lifetime of learning. I have learned alot from Brians instruction here and learned much from all of you!!!!!!!! I have been into guitar since way back when off and on, off and on, never going anywhere. I came across Active Melody and a few things finally kicked into gear. I play a few other insturments but guitar is always what I do most. You got to go alittle at a time. You will get it. Don’t force it. My faverite scales are the major/minor pentatonic and the major. I am not a whizz at this. I have to really work at it. I have heard that there are some players who only use the blues/pentatonic scale. Is that true? I have also seen guys mix the major and minor
notes, called (accidentals). In some cases it works killer.
Its practice, enjoy your ride. With the help from the good people here you will get really good.

fresnojohns

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 115

Joined 2013-01-20

PM

I have to concur. If you’re cutting off one note to get to the next you need to slow down. Each note needs to be completed before you move to the next. As far as letting them ring, that’s personal style. Do you want your notes bleeding into one another? Sometimes yes? sometimes no? Listen to Dave Gilmour. He seldom lets one note bleed over the next, but that’s his style. His CHOICE is to stop the note before playing the next. If you’re doing it to get to the next note faster, that’s not style, that’s lack of patience. So keep practicing, every day, without exception unless in the case of an emergency, and it will come. But it takes years, not weeks or months. So as someone else here said, settle in and enjoy the ride. There is no destination, no final resting place. You will never know it all, so what’s the hurry?

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 115

Joined 2013-01-20

PM

fresnojohns - 19 August 2013 08:04 AM

Butch and Neil,

The two best comments I have heard in a long time!!!!!!!!

Music is a lifetime of learning. I have learned alot from Brians instruction here and learned much from all of you!!!!!!!! I have been into guitar since way back when off and on, off and on, never going anywhere. I came across Active Melody and a few things finally kicked into gear. I play a few other insturments but guitar is always what I do most. You got to go alittle at a time. You will get it. Don’t force it. My faverite scales are the major/minor pentatonic and the major. I am not a whizz at this. I have to really work at it. I have heard that there are some players who only use the blues/pentatonic scale. Is that true? I have also seen guys mix the major and minor
notes, called (accidentals). In some cases it works killer.
Its practice, enjoy your ride. With the help from the good people here you will get really good.

fresnojohns

Mixing major and minor are not accidentals. Accidentals are the notes that fall outside of the scale you’re playing. For example, If you’re playing a C scale and play C#, that’s an accidental.

     
RankRankRank

Total Posts: 69

Joined 2011-11-26

PM

Can you explain the accidentals more please. I am struggling to understand this. I was led to believe that all sharps and flats were accidentals.

Thanks, Alan

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 115

Joined 2013-01-20

PM

The only time a sharp or flat is an accidental is if it’s outside the key you’re playing in. Another example: The key of G has 1 sharp. F#, so if you’re playing in G, F# is not an accidental. If you were to play D# in the Key of G that would be an accidental. (It would also be the sharp 5, but that’s another discussion). My advice to you is to learn your keys. How many sharps (or flats) are in each key and what they are. They go in order so once you start to learn the keys you will start to see a pattern.

     
RankRankRank

Total Posts: 69

Joined 2011-11-26

PM

Thanks for the explanation. I have just gone back to the utube lesson I had watched and with your explanation it now makes sense.

Thanks again, Alan

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 288

Joined 2012-05-19

PM

Diamon5 - 19 August 2013 02:14 PM

The only time a sharp or flat is an accidental is if it’s outside the key you’re playing in. Another example: The key of G has 1 sharp. F#, so if you’re playing in G, F# is not an accidental. If you were to play D# in the Key of G that would be an accidental. (It would also be the sharp 5, but that’s another discussion). My advice to you is to learn your keys. How many sharps (or flats) are in each key and what they are. They go in order so once you start to learn the keys you will start to see a pattern.

Thank you Diamon5.  That is what I was trying to say. As above, learning keys, the sharps, the flats all smooth. Learn what ever scale you are doing up and down the neck. Learn which positions/patterns have that sound you are looking for. Also, learn every note, on every string, every fret. It may sound long but it will help you with your overall playing.

As far as playing accidentals…......Notes outside of a scale you are playing in…......What until you have your positions and patterns down really well. When you play notes outside of your key sometimes they don’ t sound
right and its because they are not from that key. I will use them only when needed. There are some cool tracks on this site to jam to as well.
fresnojohns

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 128

Joined 2012-11-19

PM

on the subject of scales, how many are there and which are the best ones to learn?

my interest is in blues and 70’s rock music (black Sabbath and pink Floyd being my favs)

I am currently learning the A minor pentatonic scale from youtube, but even this is different to the A scale so I am wondering how many I need to learn and which ones to allow me to eventually be able to solo with my fav bands?

Neil.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 115

Joined 2013-01-20

PM

ALL scales are derived from the Major scale, so learning those in all 12 keys should be your first concern. Since you’re talking about pentatonics, the intervals are 1, b3, 4, 5, b7. of the major scale. Most blues and rock players will also add the 2 and the 6 and the b5 (the blue note). Then if you’re playing a dominate blues (as opposed to a minor blues) you can add the major 3rd. Now you’re up to 9 notes and 2 of them are outside the Major scale. Confused? That’s why it’s important that you’re familiar with your Major scales so you know which notes to play and which not to, and why, depending on the piece. At that point you might want to get into Modes.