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chords or solo progression priority?

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Hi guys

  When I first got my guitar I was practicing solo’s of my fav tunes from the web, then I found chord lessons which I have to say are much easier, should my priority be to get to know the chords first, then go onto solo stuff or solo first so I can play my fav tunes? I am noticing also that major chords and minor chords of each key are mostly very similar with in some cases just one finger movement to get from one to the other which is encouraging. my fav chords are the minor ones as I like the sad sound but should I also be using major chords in the same progression? I also like to arpeggiate the chords with some very nice sounds progressing, any advice where to go from here would be much appreciated.

Neil.

     
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Most players learn basic first postion chords and progressions(“cowboy chords) ... like d, a, g…or c, f, g…. and some simple songs before moving on to learning the notes on the fretboard, a basic 1, 4, 5 blues in E, (shuffle) and then to some sime riffs and solos.  Learning to play (strum) songs is a lot more fun and you begin to understand timing, tempo, how & why solos fit into the song…its your call but thats what i’d do . Neil E.


h

     
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I tend to concentrate on chords and rhythm as a first priority, but that’s probably because I used to play bass so am used to thinking in a whole band context :-)

Brian’s more chord-y lessons are good - eg. The Steve cropper-style one, the Bo Diddley one, the Keith Richards one etc. Not just strumming or simple chords, but something a whole lot funkier.

     
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This must be the Neil page! How many of us r on the forum?;-)

     
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Neiles335 - 22 May 2013 08:42 PM

This must be the Neil page! How many of us r on the forum?;-)

I know what you mean, the weather warms up and the guitars go in the closet….not really but the forum isn’t as active as it once was.

To address the initial question of chords vs solo, there are a lot of people who can blister the neck with hot solos and struggle to play fairly simple chord progression.

Its been said that 90% of the time, the average player will be playing rhythm, regardless of style. Can’t argue with that. What sets the blues apart from other styles and has influenced other styles greatly is the call and response technique. The singer sings a line, the guitar speaks back. A good illustration is the Allman’s cover of Muddy Waters’ tune Trouble No More

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWTlgaD-bSc

Duane merely augmented what Gregg was singing. The guitar was the main instrument that carried the lyrics.

Fast forward to 2013 - we must strive to do our part, whatever that part is. As guitarist, we must be able, as Duane did, support the vocal for the majority of the time but to be ready to play augment that melody with song melodic fills.
What I’m trying to say is merely that our lead playing is only an extension of overall picture and those lead line must be in harmony to the chords. If we don’t understand, chords and rhythm, our lead lines will sound mechanical instead of musical. 
Dave Mason did a version of The Shirelles ‘Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?’. If you listen to his version, you hear his guitar playing chordal arpeggios, the organ is playing chord but is playing fill riffs to support the vocal and then Dave steps in for a melodic solo. Its all based on understanding the chord structure of the song.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-uTiJ5q8kc

So, in closing brothers & sisters, my take is to be a student of the song instead of debating which is more important between chords and solo.
What does it take to adequately play the tune correctly? Where and how do the parts fit together and what must I be able to do and what must I know to accomplish it?

Phewww, its been a long day and as Robert Plant sang ‘I guess I’ll keep on ramblin’, sing my song….’

 

     

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Keith
aka Bluezhawk
http://www.blueshawk.info/intro.htm

 

 

 

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A much wiser and talented musican than I told me that to be a better soloist learn all your chords.
Many of the notes you play while soloing are in the chords you play as well. Learning the colour tones with chords will sound the same as when you use those notes while soloing.
  For eg. if you learn a C6 chord your ear will hear what that note will sound like when playing an A note with a C chord.
  Gordo

     
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Thanks guys, I have gone back to the basics and am learning the most used chords and the easiest route to change from one to another and I am enjoying the guitar much more now, I will learn the chords then go on to soloing techniques.

thanks again.

Neil.

     
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Neiles335 - 21 May 2013 11:10 PM

Most players learn basic first postion chords and progressions(“cowboy chords) ... like d, a, g…or c, f, g…. and some simple songs before moving on to learning the notes on the fretboard, a basic 1, 4, 5 blues in E, (shuffle) and then to some sime riffs and solos.  Learning to play (strum) songs is a lot more fun and you begin to understand timing, tempo, how & why solos fit into the song…its your call but thats what i’d do . Neil E.


h

Thankyou Neil, you are so right, I thought I wanted to go straight into learning how to solo and lead, I then took a step back and found some lessons that made me learn some chords and simple strumming excercises and it’s loads more fun, I am actually about to start strumming to some of my fave bands I feel so I am delighted with your advice.

thanks again

Neil.

     
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great rhythm = better solo

     
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chords…

I have parkisons ...now its easier to play lead licks than complicated chords . 
but I do believe the more chords the better musician.,.
“guitar George knows all the chords”

     
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Try Brian’s Swing Lesson.  It’s pretty easy with a nice balance of chords and lead, especially slides, hammer-ons, and pull-offs for good practice.